Coquitlam expands pickleball; tennis players looking for a little more love

The three tennis courts at Bramble Park in Coquitlam are set to be permanently converted into eight dedicated pickleball courts this summer as Coquitlam attempts to meet growing demand for the popular paddle sport.

Besides the $65,000 Bramble project, Coquitlam is looking to add eight new outdoor tennis courts and 20 new indoor pickleball courts by 2027.

  • Four indoor pickleball courts at Place Maillardville Community Centre in 2022
  • Three pickleball courts at the Burquitlam YMCA in 2022
  • One new outdoor tennis court at Blue Mountain Park in 2025
  • Three new outdoor tennis courts at Cottonwood Park in 2026
  • Eight new indoor pickleball courts at the Northeast Community Centre in 2026

Anyone for tennis?

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Coquitlam city staff have not tried to work with private operators to add either indoor or covered tennis courts, “nor has staff identified funding for such a facility in the five-year capital plan,” according to a city staff report.

“Tennis players read this report and some of them were crying,” commented Coun. Trish Mandewo. “The fight for indoor courts has been going on for almost 30 years.”

In the long-term, Coquitlam is working toward having tennis courts not more than a two-kilometre walk from all residents – a plan that will require new courts in the city’s northeast neighbourhoods.

This summer, city staff are set to put up signs at all outdoor tennis courts limiting casual play to 30-minute increments.

Those signs are much needed, according to Mandewo.

“There are so many fights that happen because everybody’s competing to get on the court. I have seen the RCMP being called,” she said.

Sweet pickleball

Given that the sport is fun and easy on your body, pickleball is a “kind of a dream sport for a municipality to support,” according to Coun. Chris Wilson.

Wilson recounted his own experiences on the pickleball alongside a few non-traditional athletes.

“I know if it wasn’t for pickleball they’d be at home watching TV having a beer.”

Wilson predicted the sport would continue to grow and encouraged the city to act accordingly.

“I think we need to be scouring the city to find suitable locations [for pickleball courts],” he said.

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